US Crude Oil Import Statistics by State

US Crude Oil: Imports, 1980 – 2021 | CEIC Data

In his State of the Union Address on January 31, 2006, then-president George W. Bush spoke of America’s addiction to oil. His point was that the U.S. needed to develop cleaner, cheaper and more reliable alternative energy sources.

Partly due to lower oil prices and a slowing economy, overall U.S. imports of crude oil were US$188.5 billion in 2009. That amount is 13% lower than in 2006 and 45% less than in 2008.

The harmonized system tariff code for crude oil is 270900.

Top Oil Importing States by Amount

California, Texas and Illinois consumed about 23% of all crude oil imported into the U.S. last year.

Shown below are the top 10 states for importing crude oil in 2008.

 

  1. California … US$15.1 billion, down 51.4% from 2008
  2. Texas … $14.7 billion, down 40.1%
  3. Illinois … $14.2 billion, down 39.4%
  4. New Jersey … $6.7 billion, down 47.6%
  5. Pennsylvania … $5.7 billion, down 47%
  6. Louisiana … $5.2 billion, down 54.3%
  7. Kansas … $3.3 billion, up 4,150%
  8. Washington … $3.2 billion, down 41.9%
  9. Hawaii … $2.6 billion, down 36.6%
  10. Delaware … $1.5 billion, down 55.5%.

Among the top 12 oil importing U.S. states, only Kansas showed an increase in its addiction to foreign oil from levels in 2008. Crude oil imports into Kansas were up an astounding 4,150% in 2009.

States Where Oil is the Highest Percentage Import

Total amounts sometimes do not present a clear picture of a state’s dependency on foreign oil. Shown below are states where crude oil represents the highest percentage of overall imports.

  1. Montana … US$88 million (76.1% of state’s total imports)
  2. Wyoming … $99 million (69.2%)
  3. Louisiana … $5.2 billion (68.9%)
  4. Hawaii … $2.6 billion (67.4%)
  5. Mississippi … $414 million (53.4%)
  6. Texas … $14.7 billion (33%)
  7. Kansas … $3.3 billion (27.5%)
  8. Pennsylvania … $5.7 billion (22.5%
  9. Alaska … $250 million (20.1%)
  10. Illinois … $14.2 billion (16.5%).

Louisiana and Hawaii appear farther down the list of states in terms of the dollar value of imported oil. Yet, those 2 states are near the top of the list of jurisdictions where crude oil represents the highest percentage of overall imports.

Fastest Declining Oil Imports by State

The following top 10 states excelled at reducing the value of their foreign crude oil imports. Minnesota and Oklahoma made the greatest strides in cutting down their dependency on imported oil.

  1. Minnesota … US$1.1 billion, down 84.3% from 2008
  2. Oklahoma … $242 million, down 72.6%
  3. Delaware … $1.5 billion, down 55.5%
  4. Virginia … $404 million, down 54.8%
  5. Alabama … $1.3 billion, down 54.5%
  6. Louisiana … $5.2 billion, down 54.3%
  7. Wyoming … $99 million, down 53.5%
  8. California … $15.1 billion, down 51.4%
  9. New Jersey … $6.7 billion, down 47.6%
  10. Pennsylvania … $5.7 billion, down 47%.

So, is America still addicted to foreign oil? Certainly, states such as Montana, Wyoming, Louisiana, Hawaii and Mississippi have a high dependency on imported crude oil which accounts for over 50% of each state’s overall imports.

There did appear to be some improvements in number of states during 2009. Kansas was the biggest disappointment with a 4,150% increase in crude oil imports over 2008. Connecticut increased its crude oil imports by 643%.

It remains to be seen whether American has cured its foreign oil addiction, with alternative energy permanently replacing crude petroleum provided by international suppliers.